Tag Archives: children

For all of us who educate children: Dalton Sherman: I believe in me. Do you?

Charles Rice Learning Center in South Dallas – An inner-city school–with an enrollment that is 99 percent
African- American, 83 percent eligible for subsidized lunches, and nearly 70 percent living with one or neither parent–has students who consistently win city-wide math and computer contests, a choir group
that has performed nationally, and achievement records that have attracted the attention of the federal Department of Education.

Full Text of Speech:
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Life

Sometimes it takes the miracle of birth to put everything into perspective.  I was priveleged enough to witness the birth of my second grandchild last week, a boy.  What an experience.  An experience that confirms my convictions more than ever to do my little part during my lifetime to stand up against the injustices to life and the planet and work towards a better world for the life with which it is inhabited.

Health Care

As time passes I become more and more frustrated with the health care system in the U.S.

Recently I found out that my 18 year old pregnant daughter is facing open heart surgery. On top of the emotional shock and drain this is causing on her and me, the amount of “stuff” she is going through with doctors and insurance is unbelievable. Because she is 18 and not in school, she was just informed the other day that she would not be covered on her dad’s insurance. She turned 18 in December and was told (again just the other day) that not only would she not be covered, but all doctor’s bills that this insurance company had paid would be billed to her to have to pay. This will amount to thousands of dollars.

She is pregnant with no job and now newly diagnosed heart disease.

We are going to see if her state insurance (which served as her secondary insurance as a pregnant teen) will cover those bills, but who knows……

To put it bluntly: Health Care in the U.S. sucks.

One of the many reasons I am a member of the Green Party is because of its position on health care, particularly the section on Universal Health Care. I strongly advocate this position which promotes a single payer health care system and where everyone receives health care, a basic human right.

I have joined a LJ support community which I hope will help further my understanding of heart disease and what others with similar issues endure in the treatment process.

Health Care

As time passes I become more and more frustrated with the health care system in the U.S.

Recently I found out that my 18 year old pregnant daughter is facing open heart surgery. On top of the emotional shock and drain this is causing on her and me, the amount of “stuff” she is going through with doctors and insurance is unbelievable. Because she is 18 and not in school, she was just informed the other day that she would not be covered on her dad’s insurance. She turned 18 in December and was told (again just the other day) that not only would she not be covered, but all doctor’s bills that this insurance company had paid would be billed to her to have to pay. This will amount to thousands of dollars.

She is pregnant with no job and now newly diagnosed heart disease.

We are going to see if her state insurance (which served as her secondary insurance as a pregnant teen) will cover those bills, but who knows……

To put it bluntly: Health Care in the U.S. sucks.

One of the many reasons I am a member of the Green Party is because of its position on health care, particularly the section on Universal Health Care:

The United States is the only industrialized nation in the world without a national health care system. The current system’s high costs and widely recognized failures demand that bold steps be taken. The Green Party supports a universal, comprehensive, national single-payer health insurance program as the only solution to the current disastrous for-profit system.
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Health care for children in the U.S.

The Bushites will not stop at elevating privatization of healthcare:

The Bush administration, continuing its fight to stop states from expanding the popular Children’s Health Insurance Program, has adopted new standards that would make it much more difficult for New York, California and others to extend coverage to children in middle-income families.

Administration officials outlined the new standards in a letter sent to state health officials on Friday evening, in the middle of a month-long Congressional recess. In interviews, they said the changes were aimed at returning the Children’s Health Insurance Program to its original focus on low-income children and to make sure the program did not become a substitute for private health coverage.

A “substitute for private health coverage”?  I think what they mean is that they don’t want the profits of private health companies being compromised by more and more folks becoming eligible for the CHIP program. 

If thehealth care system in this country wasn’t so focused on greed and profit-making at the expense of the health care needs of very single person living in America, there would not be a need for programs like CHIP and there would be no competition for insurance companies because there would be NO insurance companies.  Imagine, EVERYONE receiving the health care they need, regardless of income.  What a concept.

The Bush Administration has left our children behind in many ways.  This is yet another example of how Americans are continuing to be screwed.

About to be a Grandma!

Just got the word – my grandson is making his way out into our world! I’ll post here when it’s official.

Uninsured Chidlren Numbers Increase

According to an article in today’s Salt Lake Tribune, more and more children in the U.S. are uninsured. The Deseret News, in its article today on the same issue, has a chart on the statistics.

More than half of America’s 9 million uninsured children live in two-parent families, a new analysis of 2005 U.S. census data show. And in most of these two-parent families, both parents work. In Utah, a whopping 91 percent of an estimated 88,458 uninsured kids have at least one working parent.

Low-income families – those with incomes at twice the federal poverty level, or up to $33,200 for a family of three – are still most at risk. In Utah, 65 percent of uninsured kids fall in this category, the report shows. But “increasingly, this is a problem for the middle-class,” said Judi Hilman, executive director of the Utah Health Policy Project.

The Governor of Utah is proposing a mandate that all children in Utah have health insurance.
Under the plan, parents would be required to enroll their kids in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) if they qualify. This would take a big bite out of Utah’s uninsured, at least 52,000 youth.

But mandated coverage won’t work for everyone until private insurers offer affordable plans for middle-income families, says Hilman. “How can you mandate something that’s not affordable?”

My point exactly. Having been in uninsured situations before (with small children) I can attest first hand at how discriminatory and sometimes unattainable our current system is with regards to health care. Families either go without insurance or go in debt if health care is needed.

What’s wrong with this picture? Health care is a basic need. As are food, water, and education. When these needs are not provided or made unattainable a dominoe effect occurs. Lack of health care and food affect young people’s ability to concentrate in school. And we know what happens then (see my article below on No Child Left Behind and Utah’s schools). The “greatest country on earth” is failing to provide these basic human needs to a siginicantly large portion of our population.