Tag Archives: 2008 elections

Two Utahns and others: The First 100 Days: What would a Green Administration look like?

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The Green Party has asked Green leaders from all over the US to tell America what a Green President of the United States would do during the ‘First 100 Day’s of his or her administration.

Green candidates and members of the Green Party’s Speakers Bureau submitted video clips and short essays to describe what they’d do if elected to the White House and what Green steps President Obama should take to resolve the nation’s problems.

“This is our Inauguration Day gift to Barack Obama and to America.  We celebrate the landmark election of America’s first African American president, but we’re worried that Barack Obama will retreat from his promises of change, especially given some of his Cabinet appointments.  That’s why we’ve collected these recommendations from prominent Green Party members,” said Sanda Everett, co-chair of the Green Party of the United States.
Brian Czech
Ph.D. ecologist and Certified Wildlife Biologist  

Steady State Economy

read more about Mr. Czech here . . .

 


morgen-darc-head-shot-100-d2Morgen D’Arc
Co-Founder, Co-Spokesperson and Former Co-Chair, National Women’s Caucus; Chair, Cumberland County Green Party; 2002 Candidate for Cumberland County Register of Deeds; National Green Party Delegate, 2002-2006 and 2007-present, Maine

Women: Rights, Issues And Conditions. A Breakthrough Agenda

read more about Ms. D’Arc here . . .
 

 


kathydoppKathy Dopp
M.S. Mathematics, Executive Director, National Election Data Archive, UT  

Election Integrity

read more about Ms. Dopp here . . .
 

 

 


forthoferron_94Ron Forthofer
2002 Green Party candidate for Governor of Colorado, 2000 candidate for Congress, CO  

Israeli-Palestinian conflict

read more about Mr. Forthofer here . . .

 


cynthia-mckinney-red-approvCynthia McKinney
2008 Green Party Candidate for President

Discussing Palestine, Israel, and her trip on a relief boat destined for the Gaza

More from Ms. McKinney on the Middle East

 

 


taylordeanna_94Deeana Taylor
Co-Coordinator, Desert Greens Green Party of Utah, 2006 Green Party candidate for Salt Lake County Council  

for Single Payer

read more about Ms. Taylor here . . .

 

 


petevan-2008Pete Van, Jr
2006 Green Party Candidate for the Michigan State House of Representatives/District 88 (Allegan County)  

Economy

read more about Mr. Van here . . .

 

 

 


wellslaura_94Laura Wells
2002 and 2006 Green Party candidate for State Controller, CA  

Peace/Healthcare

read more about Ms. Wells here . . .

 

Obama’s Inaugural Speech – Video

Video of Speech

Obaman’s Inaugural Address

Obama’s Inaugural Address: The Full Text

My fellow citizens: I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.

Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forbearers, and true to our founding documents.

So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.

That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.

These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land — a nagging fear that America’s decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.

Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America — they will be met.

On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.

On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn-out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.

Continue reading

Honeymoon’s Over!

The day before he was inaugurated as 44th President of the United States, he held dinners for two war criminals:

Jan. 19, 2009

The New York Times
In Bipartisan Appeal, Obama Praises McCain and Powell
By Katharine Q. Seelye

In a major bipartisan appeal on the eve of his inauguration, Barack Obama held dinners Monday evening for Republicans Colin Powell and John McCain, praising both to the skies and perhaps making a down payment on future political success.

In an unusual effort to create political opportunity out of what is usually a dead period in the days leading up to an inauguration, Mr. Obama reached across the aisle and across the battle lines of the last election, calling his former opponent a man who sought common ground and attaching superlatives to Mr. Powell.

He did not mention that Mr. McCain evinced little of his bipartisan side during the presidential campaign.

“There are few Americans who understand this need for common purpose and common effort better than John McCain,” Mr. Obama said at the dinner he held for Mr. McCain at the Washington Hilton. “It is what he has strived for and achieved throughout his life. It is built into the very content of his character.” Continue reading

Malik Rahim: The Results

Yesterday New Orleans held its elections, delayed as a reult of the effects of Hurricane Gustav.  Results of the races can be viewed on The Louisiana Secretary of State’s website and also at WWL Radio‘s website.

Green Party member Malik Rahim ran a strong race despite a media blackout on his campaign. 

Marnie Glickman, Founder and Executive Director of Green Change , and who spearheaded a volunteer phone banking effort, writes:

Our dedicated phone team dialed 2,309 phone numbers, spoke with 334  voters and left messages with 847 households.

With all precincts reporting in, according to information from the above websites, Malik received 3% of the vote, or 1,880 votes.

The news items published to date (see list below) do not mention Malik Rahim’s campaign.  In this particular race, the Democratic incumbent, William J. Jefferson, was defeated by little known lawyer Repulican Anh Cao.  Jefferson’s public career (this would have been his 10th term) was likely affected by his indictment and pending trial on corruption charges.  The NY Times reports that analyses of the race indicate that the Republican win is probably the result of a large white voter turnout:

In heavily white precincts, turnout was about 26 percent, while it was only about 12 percent in the heavily black precincts, said Greg Rigamer, a New Orleans demographer and analyst.

Independent News Sites did post scattered articles on Malik’s race:

"I" Report:  Malik Rahim: Another Candidate in Louisiana’s 2nd District

Other News Items about this Congressional Race in NOLA:

New York Times:   Voters Oust Indicted Congressman in Louisiana

Associated Press Brief

CNN:  Indicted Louisiana congressman loses re-election bid

BBC: Vietnam-born lawyer wins US poll

Politico: Holy Cao: Republican defeats Jefferson

Assorted other links from Google News

 

 

On the Wilder Side has an update on the elections in Louisiana today, specifically the congressional race in which Malik Rahim is running.

According to the post, it is being reported that voter turnout is low and that news items are highlighting the Democrat incumbent’s pending corruption charges.

More News

Green Change

Green Party  Watch

Voters deciding whether to re-elect indicted Louisiana congressman

Indicted La. congressman tries to get re-elected

 

Malik Rahim – A Vote for Life

Message from Malik: A Voice for EVERYONE if elected

Dear friends in the struggle,

As you may be aware, I am seeking election to the United States House  of Representatives on December 6. I apologize in advance for the  impersonal nature of this letter. I wish I would have had time to call  my friends to discuss the details of this campaign. I’m sending this  message because I need your help.

Four days after Hurricane Katrina and two days before founding Common  Ground I made this decision to run for Congress. This decision was  made due to the lack of government response to Katrina. My hope is  that never again will any disaster turn into such a tragedy.

This is a winnable seat; a seat not just for residents of the New  Orleans area but a peoples’ seat for all those who stand for  environmental peace and justice. This goal can only be reached with  your support.

I will provide concrete alternatives to the wars being waged against  our communities at home and to the wars continuing abroad. Our  communities deserve no less. I will continue to advocate for safe,  affordable housing, the establishment of universal healthcare, and  invest in a comprehensive storm protection system and wetland
restoration. I would initiate repeal of the so-called Patriot Act ,  author legislation to remove FEMA from the Department of Homeland  Security, demand an end to the costly and senseless incarceration of  nonviolent offenders, and advocate for full funding for our schools.  Running a viable campaign requires funding.

Now with less than three weeks away, the campaign has set a goal of  raising an additional $20,000 by Friday November 28. With your help we  can achieve that end.

You can contribute on the campaign website at http://www.VoteMalik.com

I also urge you to get active with our campaign. Canvass your  neighborhood and tell your friends and family. If you are out of town,  we need additional volunteers on election day and the week leading up  to the election. You can phone bank remotely from home or promote the  campaign online.

In closing, I want to remind you that I will work tirelessly for the  people of District 2. But even if you are not in my Congressional  District, your cause is in my heart; you will have not only a committed advocate, but an office to work out of on the Hill.

In the struggle for environmental peace and justice,

Malik Rahim

Continue reading

Campaign to Elect Malik Rahim News

I and many others have personally contributed money to this campaign.

Pat LaMarche, 2004 Green Party Vice Presidential Candidate and Maine Green Party Member writes from NOLA:

Please tell everyone we love them and we have a campaign that actually could win.

please tell them that i was at the common ground collective today and met a woman returning to her home in the ninth ward tomorrow for the first time in three years.  tell them that she was so happy and it was malik and common ground that made it possible.  then tell them that after malik got her some lunch because her life is so hectic today… that she told me about her brother dying … drowning as he helped her save their children’s lives.

please tell everyone that this is a man they can help new orleans send to congress and we are doing the best we can… but we need the international leverage… money.

help!!!!!  anyone thinking of coming here to hellp….. donate the amount you would have paid for  your plane ticket.  he has such a great organization here… it only needs fuel for the engine and unfortuantely that’s money.

we can do this.

And from Cynthia McKinney:

Hello!

I’ve been busy contemplating so many questions from so many of you about where do we go from here. It is clear that many understand the challenges that we now face and what is becoming even clearer is that far more who didn’t vote for us are now looking to us for leadership on issues that we raised during the campaign like, for example, the bailout. I do have some concrete, solution-oriented ideas and will explore them with you in the days ahead. But I wanted to do something now that is important to all of us, because we still have one more Congressional election within our grasp.

We all know the importance of having someone of conscience in the United States Congress, someone of unbending commitment to our values and not just another representative of "business-as-usual" politics. Malik Rahim proved his mettle when we all watched in horror as events unfolded in New Orleans and the Gulf States. What a shame that African-American Hurricane Katrina survivors have had to file a discrimination lawsuit against Louisiana’s Road Home program in order to earn their right of return. With Malik in Washington, our own internally displaced population can finally see justice–and not just abundant hot air–delivered from the halls of the U.S. Capitol. We need Malik now and now Malik needs us. Bill Jefferson, the incumbent, has been indicted on 16 counts of corruption charges. We need Malik in that seat! For those of you who are close to Louisiana, please consider giving Malik a weekend to knock on doors and make important voter contact in the lead-up to the December 6 Louisiana General Election. Please visit http://www.votemalik.com/ and make a contribution today!

Here’s an article on Malik:

A Conversation with Malik Rahim
BY ADAM FLEMING
Pittsburgh City Paper, November 13, 2008
http://www.pittsburghcitypaper.ws/gyrobase/Content?oid=oid%3A55307

Malik Rahim has been many things. He’s been a Black Panther, an armed robber and a social activist. He is currently a Green Party congressional candidate in New Orleans; the election cycle for some Louisiana districts was delayed because of Hurricane Gustav. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Rahim co-founded the Common Ground Collective to provide assistance to low-income residents. This week, the Thomas Merton Center honors Rahim at its annual award dinner, on Wed., Nov. 12.

[Q] What was your reaction to Barack Obama’s victory?

None, other than to say that history was made. And now it’s: How we can really come up with a plan to clean our environment, and then second, do something to save our economy without just giving bailouts to the rich?

[Q] Are you upset that New Orleans wasn’t mentioned during the debates?

I don’t fault [Obama]. I fault our city’s administration for not really pushing that we are still really in dire need of assistance. The Saints are winning and Mardi Gras was a success, then hey, you’re going to have a lack of enthusiasm from any politician. It’s a city that’s based upon tourism, and they believe that telling the truth would be bad for tourists. [But people need] to see our school system and the deplorable situation that they’re in. To see the health-care agencies, and how in dire need the city is for hospital beds. If you look at the lack of opportunity in the midst of a construction boom. The tough questions that need to be asked aren’t asked.

We can’t talk about just building levy walls. We’ve got to talk about, how can we restore our wetlands? We’ve got to talk about some alternatives for when we have to evacuate. We need to constantly teach and train the residents of New Orleans about disaster-preparedness. We can’t go on living in New Orleans as if we’re living in Arizona.

[Q] What needs to change in the reconstruction of New Orleans?

We have to move into a clear direction of hope: How can we assure people that, hey, you can come back. You will be able to rebuild. That we’re not just concerned about the French Quarter or the Superdome. That every citizen in this city is important. Once we start doing this, then we will get the people’s involvement. Right now, if we had just the resources that we are spending on incarcerating non-violent offenders, the Ninth Ward would be rebuilt.

[Q] Do you consider yourself a radical?

Yes, indeed, I consider myself a radical. It pushes those who are not about peace and justice away, but for those who truly have made a stand for environmental peace and justice, I believe they gravitate towards the ideas that I have shown. It’s not like something that I’m saying is wrong. People have [come] and seen this.

[Q] You say the Common Ground Collective has organized thousands of volunteers in New Orleans. Are you upset that New Orleans wasn’t mentioned during the debates?

I don’t fault [Obama]. I fault our city’s administration for not really pushing that we are still really in dire need of assistance. … The Saints are winning and Mardi Gras was a success, then hey, you’re going to have a lack of enthusiasm from any politician. … It’s a city that’s based upon tourism, and they believe that telling the truth would be bad for tourists. … [But people need] to see our school system and the deplorable situation that they’re in. To see the health-care agencies, and how in dire need the city is for hospital beds. … If you look at the lack of opportunity in the midst of a construction boom. … The tough questions that need to be asked aren’t asked.

We can’t talk about just building levy walls. We’ve got to talk about, how can we restore our wetlands? … We’ve got to talk about some alternatives for when we have to evacuate. … We need to constantly teach and train the residents of New Orleans about disaster-preparedness. We can’t go on living in New Orleans as if we’re living in Arizona.

[Q] What needs to change in the reconstruction of New Orleans?

We have to move into a clear direction of hope: How can we assure people that, hey, you can come back. You will be able to rebuild. That we’re not just concerned about the French Quarter or the Superdome. That every citizen in this city is important. Once we start doing this, then we will get the people’s involvement. … Right now, if we had just the resources that we are spending on incarcerating non-violent offenders, the Ninth Ward would be rebuilt.

[Q] Do you consider yourself a radical?

Yes, indeed, I consider myself a radical. … It pushes those who are not about peace and justice away, but for those who truly have made a stand for environmental peace and justice, I believe they gravitate towards the ideas that I have shown. … It’s not like something that I’m saying is wrong. People have [come] and seen this.

[Q] You say the Common Ground Collective has organized thousands of volunteers in New Orleans. What’s so radical about people flocking to save a city in need?

Because of the fact that it has never been done: In the history of America, never have you had 18,000 predominantly whites come into an African-American community in solidarity. Not as exploiters or oppressors. This is the first time this has been done. And they have lived in those communities and have helped to rebuild. … Yeah, some people might call it radical, but there are people who classify Christ as being radical. Mohammad was a radical. I’m in good company.

[Q] What do you think of people calling Obama a radical for associating with Rev. Jeremiah Wright and former Weatherman Bill Ayers?

I believe it would take a small-minded person to tell anyone that has met with those individuals that "You are a radical." … This is a nation that was made by radicals. It came into existence by radicals. What’s the difference between Obama meeting with those individuals or someone meeting with George Washington? Who could be more radical than the founding fathers of this country?

[Q] After leaving New Orleans in the 1970s, you were arrested for armed robbery in California. What happened?

That’s what it took to save my life and to change the direction I was heading. At that time, just like most young black men, I was full of rage and felt like the movement had abandoned us, and we did some things that we are no longer proud of. … I didn’t come out of prison asking anyone for any hand. But I had a support mechanism, I had a family.

[Q] How did your time in prison shape your role as a prison-rights activist?

I know the plight. I know what is needed to turn people around. I know what is needed to do to build a better tomorrow. … We have to understand, we cannot jail everyone. It’s not the idea that people are born criminals. I’m a firm believer that that’s folly. I believe in conditions. We have to talk about cause and effect. What causes a person to resort to crime?

[Q] From your perspective in New Orleans, what’s missing from the current national political dialogue?

How can we transform this nation into the nation that it once was? At one time America was a great nation, and it wasn’t great because we were the most powerful or the richest, it was our ability to reach out and help people in need. And I believe we can do it again.

Utah’s Radical Cheerleaders – Video at Equality Rally

I am a member of Pom Poms Not Bomb Bombs which participated in the Equality Rally on Saturday.

Below is a video that Lionel Trepanier took and edited into a really nice piece.