Tag Archives: iraq war

Cheney Speech at BYU Causes Outcry

Cheney Speech at BYU Causes Outcry

by Nathan Johnson

At BYU — in the heart of what has been called the reddest county in the nation — the mere possibility of Vice President Dick Cheney coming to campus is getting some blue blood boiling.

Cheney is scheduled to be Brigham Young University’s keynote speaker at this year’s graduation ceremonies. While it is a day of celebration for many, some BYU administrators and faculty, alongside parents and students, are expressing displeasure with the VP’s visit.0327 02 1 2 3

Despite the opposition, BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins said that there are currently no plans to eliminate Cheney as a part of the graduation ceremonies.

BYU Marriott School professor Warner Woodworth said that he has received e-mails from all over the world expressing dismay over Cheney’s visit.

Woodworth said that some of those e-mails came from parents and LDS stake presidents, particularly in Latin America, expressing anger that Cheney — whom they called a “warmonger” — will be representing their children and their church.

Woodworth said that administrators, faculty and even some students and parents are refusing to attend graduation ceremonies if Cheney is speaking. Pickets and other forms of protest are also being planned, he said.

Nephi Henry, a BYU student who will be graduating next month, is working with other students in organizing opposition to Cheney’s visit.

 

Henry said his group felt that it was not appropriate for someone of such an “inflammatory” nature to be at BYU. Henry criticized the move to have Cheney because the vice president does not meet the university’s policy on speakers having “a good public reputation and a moral private life.” Additionally, he said the invitation violated BYU’s policy of political neutrality.

“It certainly looks like the church is endorsing someone of a highly patrician political nature,” he said.

Woodworth also expressed concern over Cheney’s fitness to speak to graduates at commencement ceremonies. He said that Cheney’s moral values were not in line with what BYU represents.

“Cheney’s coming here is a contradiction of what we’re trying to do,” he said. “We represent an institution of peace, he represents an institution of war … an institution of deception and outright lies.” he said.

Despite the harsh criticism that Cheney’s invitation has generated, some students and faculty members don’t feel that sit-outs and pickets are appropriate.

BYU law school alumna turned Ph.D. student Betsy Fowler took a more cautious approach to the debate.

“A university is a forum for ideas. While members of the university community have the right to make a statement by not attending, personally I think it is too bad that professors would elect not to support their students whose work and dedication this commencement is intended to celebrate,” she said.

BYU professor of Spanish and Portuguese Ted Lyon is among those who are very displeased at the scheduling of the vice president. While Lyon is not planning to sit out, he does believe that if a political message is going to be issued, then it is necessary to issue a political message on the other side. “I’m suggesting that we invite Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama,” he said.

Lyon said that he has been included in e-mails involving more than 200 students about the vice president’s visit. Lyon said the messages had a tone and tenor of “we want our graduation to have a spiritual tone, not a political tone.”

Henry said that he is leaning toward a boycott of his own graduation if Cheney speaks.

Copyright © 2007 Daily Herald and Lee Enterprises

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MISS: National Organization of Women endorses Hillary Clinton

Boo, Hiss……..


Women’s group plans to endorse Clinton


NEW YORK (AP) — The political arm of NOW, the National Organization for Women, will endorse Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential bid on Wednesday, according to Democratic officials familiar with the plan.

AP Photo
AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

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Clinton will join NOW president Kim Gandy to accept the endorsement, which will take place at Washington’s Sewell-Belmont House, the historic home of the National Women’s Party.

 

“The NOW PAC is excited to close out Women’s History Month with news that’s sure to energize women’s rights supporters across the country,” Gandy said in an e-mail statement.

Clinton, a New York senator, has made a deliberate pitch to women voters since launching her White House bid in January. Earlier this month, her campaign unveiled “Women for Hillary,” an effort to recruit women voters to talk up Clinton’s candidacy to other women. A separate, Web-based component targeting younger women, http://www.icanbepresident.com , is another part of the outreach effort.

Clinton advisers point to 2004, when about 9 million more women than men voted in the general election.

Founded in 1966 by activist Betty Friedan, NOW is one of the oldest and best-known feminist advocacy groups in the country.

NEW YORK (AP) – Democrat Barack Obama has picked up the endorsement of Sheila C. Johnson, the ex-wife of media pioneer Robert Johnson who is backing rival Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential bid.

“Barack Obama’s campaign of change brings hope to America,” Sheila Johnson said in a statement Tuesday, praising, among other things, the Illinois senator’s opposition to the Iraq war. She also announced she will co-host a luncheon fundraiser for Obama in Washington April 19.

Robert and Sheila Johnson co-founded Black Entertainment Television in 1980 and sold it to Viacom for $3 billion in 2000, making them among the few black billionaires in the United States. The couple divorced in 2002.

Sheila Johnson now runs Salamander Hospitality, a resort and retail chain, and is president of the Washington Mystics basketball team.

Her spokeswoman, Martine Charles, said Johnson has supported both Hillary Clinton and former President Clinton in the past but shifted her allegiance to Obama after meeting with him to discuss issues facing the next president.

“She was really taken with him and thinks he has a fresh perspective on how to bring change to the country,” Charles said.

Asked whether her former husband’s decision to back Clinton had any bearing on Sheila Johnson’s decision, Charles demurred.

“She’s a woman who thinks for herself,” Charles said.

WASHINGTON (AP) – Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani is running ads on conservative talk radio shows in a direct appeal to the Republican voters who could determine the fate of his presidential campaign.

The 30-second spots are airing during Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity shows, popular broadcasts with the conservative base of the GOP. The campaign would not reveal the cost of the ad campaign but said the ads were running nationwide.

Giuliani is leading the Republican field in national polls of Republicans. But he is still viewed with apprehension by social conservatives over his past support for abortion rights, domestic partnership benefits for gay couples and gun-control measures.

The radio ad avoids those subjects.

“My campaign is about leadership and optimism,” he says in the ad. “We need strong leadership to stay on offense in the war against terrorists. We need supply side policies and reduced government spending – fiscal discipline – to keep the economy growing.”

The ad directs listeners to his new Web site, JoinRudy2008.com.

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) – One of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s top supporters says if the Democrat wins the White House, he wants to be part of her team negotiating peace in the Middle East.

Bill Shaheen, a second-generation Lebanese American, last week joined Clinton as co-chairman of her national and state campaigns. He told The Associated Press on Tuesday that reports that he withheld his endorsement until he was promised an ambassadorship were wrong.

“Did she promise (an ambassadorship)? No,” Shaheen said. “That’s not how I work. I don’t think Senator Clinton is thinking that far down the road and I would be disappointed if she was.”

Shaheen met with bloggers after a news conference announcing his endorsement last week. One blog, GreenMountainPolitics1, quoted Shaheen as saying Clinton promised to make him her Middle East envoy.

“The only thing I made Hillary promise in return for helping on her campaign is that she will send me over to the Middle East to help her work for peace in the region,” blogger Chris Stewart quoted Shaheen as saying.

In an interview Tuesday, Stewart said Shaheen never used the word “ambassador.”

The blog BlueHampshire quoted Shaheen as saying: “I said if I do all this for you, I only want one thing: I want to be on that team that brings peace to the Middle East. I believe in it. I don’t need to get paid. I just want to be on that team.”

Mike Caulfield, who posted the BlueHampshire entry, said his quotes are accurate and Shaheen did not say Clinton had made any promises.

“My impression is that he was not presenting it as a quid pro quo,” Caulfield said. “He never said anything about what Hillary said back to that.”

Shaheen helped run Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign in 1976 and went to the Palestinian territories last year as an election monitor for the Carter Center. Shaheen, whose wife served three terms as governor, is considered one of New Hampshire’s political kingmakers and helped run the New Hampshire campaigns of Al Gore and John Kerry.

WASHINGTON (AP) – The chairman of the House Appropriations Committee is endorsing John Edwards in his presidential bid.

Rep. David Obey, D-Wis., said in a statement released by the campaign that Edwards is “the kind of man I want as my president.” Obey, who has served in Congress for nearly 40 years, cited Edwards’ initiative on health care, education and Social Security.

Edwards said in the statement that he was honored to have Obey’s support.

“Dave is a good friend and a true leader on the important issues facing our country – improving our schools, guaranteeing quality, affordable health care and protecting our natural resources,” said the former North Carolina senator.

Associated Press Writer Philip Elliott in Concord, N.H., contributed to this report.

 

U.S. Military killed in action in Iraq

I will be posting the near daily reports of U.S. Soldiers KIA in Iraq over on People for Peace and Justice of Utah‘s Live Journal Community.

Folks are encouraged to copy the daily reports and forward them on to their elected officials.

John Lewis’ address to the House

Rep. Lewis speaks on House floor on 4th Anniversary of Iraq War

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under a previous order of the House, the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. John Lewis) is recognized for 5 minutes.

Mr. LEWIS of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I rise with deep concern that on this very day 4 years ago, our Nation inaugurated a conflict, an unnecessary war , a war of choice, not a necessity.

The most comprehensive intelligence we have, the National Intelligence Estimate and the latest Pentagon report, tells us that Iraq had descended into a state of civil war . Over 3,000 Americans have died, and hundreds of thousands, some even say up to 1 million citizens of Iraq, have lost their lives in this unnecessary conflict.

And while we are telling our veterans of this war , the elderly, the poor, and the sick that there is no room in the budget for them, the American people have spent over $400 billion on a failed policy. We cannot do more of the same. Mr. Speaker, violence begets violence. It does not lead to peace.
Continue reading

Final Vote Results for Roll Call 186, H R 1591:


Final Vote Results for Roll Call 186, H R 1591:
http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2007/roll186.xml

 

FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 186(Republicans in roman; Democrats in italic; Independents underlined)
      H R 1591      YEA-AND-NAY      23-Mar-2007      12:43 PM
      QUESTION:  On Passage
      BILL TITLE: Making emergency supplemental appropriations for fiscal year ending September 30, 2007, and for other purposes

Yeas Nays PRES NV
Republican 2 198   1
Democratic 216 14 1 2
Independent        
TOTALS 218 212 1 3


—- YEAS    218 —

Abercrombie
Ackerman
Allen
Altmire
Andrews
Arcuri
Baca
Baird
Baldwin
Bean
Becerra
Berkley
Berman
Berry
Bishop (GA)
Bishop (NY)
Blumenauer
Boswell
Boucher
Boyd (FL)
Boyda (KS)
Brady (PA)
Braley (IA)
Brown, Corrine
Butterfield
Capps
Capuano
Cardoza
Carnahan
Carney
Carson
Castor
Chandler
Clarke
Clay
Cleaver
Clyburn
Cohen
Conyers
Cooper
Costa
Costello
Courtney
Cramer
Crowley
Cuellar
Cummings
Davis (AL)
Davis (CA)
Davis (IL)
DeFazio
DeGette
Delahunt
DeLauro
Dicks
Dingell
Doggett
Donnelly
Doyle
Edwards
Ellison
Ellsworth
Emanuel
Engel
Eshoo
Etheridge
Farr
Fattah
Filner
Frank (MA)
Giffords
Gilchrest
Gillibrand
Gonzalez
Gordon
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grijalva
Gutierrez
Hall (NY)
Hare
Harman
Hastings (FL)
Herseth
Higgins
Hill
Hinchey
Hinojosa
Hirono
Hodes
Holden
Holt
Honda
Hooley
Hoyer
Inslee
Israel
Jackson (IL)
Jackson-Lee (TX)
Jefferson
Johnson (GA)
Johnson, E. B.
Jones (NC)
Jones (OH)
Kagen
Kaptur
Kennedy
Kildee
Kilpatrick
Kind
Klein (FL)
Lampson
Langevin
Lantos
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Levin
Lipinski
Loebsack
Lofgren, Zoe
Lowey
Lynch
Mahoney (FL)
Maloney (NY)
Markey
Matsui
McCarthy (NY)
McCollum (MN)
McDermott
McGovern
McIntyre
McNerney
Meehan
Meek (FL)
Meeks (NY)
Melancon
Millender-McDonald
Miller (NC)
Miller, George
Mitchell
Mollohan
Moore (KS)
Moore (WI)
Moran (VA)
Murphy (CT)
Murphy, Patrick
Murtha
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal (MA)
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor
Payne
Pelosi
Perlmutter
Peterson (MN)
Pomeroy
Price (NC)
Rahall
Rangel
Reyes
Rodriguez
Ross
Rothman
Roybal-Allard
Ruppersberger
Rush
Ryan (OH)
Salazar
Sánchez, Linda T.
Sanchez, Loretta
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schiff
Schwartz
Scott (GA)
Scott (VA)
Serrano
Sestak
Shea-Porter
Sherman
Shuler
Sires
Skelton
Slaughter
Smith (WA)
Snyder
Solis
Space
Spratt
Stupak
Sutton
Tanner
Tauscher
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Tierney
Towns
Udall (CO)
Udall (NM)
Van Hollen
Velázquez
Visclosky
Walz (MN)
Wasserman Schultz
Waxman
Weiner
Welch (VT)
Wexler
Wilson (OH)
Wu
Wynn
Yarmuth


—- NAYS    212 —

Aderholt
Akin
Alexander
Bachmann
Bachus
Baker
Barrett (SC)
Barrow
Bartlett (MD)
Barton (TX)
Biggert
Bilbray
Bilirakis
Bishop (UT)
Blackburn
Blunt
Boehner
Bonner
Bono
Boozman
Boren
Boustany
Brady (TX)
Brown (SC)
Brown-Waite, Ginny
Buchanan
Burgess
Burton (IN)
Buyer
Calvert
Camp (MI)
Campbell (CA)
Cannon
Cantor
Capito
Carter
Castle
Chabot
Coble
Cole (OK)
Conaway
Crenshaw
Cubin
Culberson
Davis (KY)
Davis, David
Davis, Lincoln
Davis, Tom
Deal (GA)
Dent
Diaz-Balart, L.
Diaz-Balart, M.
Doolittle
Drake
Dreier
Duncan
Ehlers
Emerson
English (PA)
Everett
Fallin
Feeney
Ferguson
Flake
Forbes
Fortenberry
Fossella
Foxx
Franks (AZ)
Frelinghuysen
Gallegly
Garrett (NJ)
Gerlach
Gillmor
Gingrey
Gohmert
Goode
Goodlatte
Granger
Graves
Hall (TX)
Hastert
Hastings (WA)
Hayes
Heller
Hensarling
Herger
Hobson
Hoekstra
Hulshof
Hunter
Inglis (SC)
Issa
Jindal
Johnson (IL)
Johnson, Sam
Jordan
Keller
King (IA)
King (NY)
Kingston
Kirk
Kline (MN)
Knollenberg
Kucinich
Kuhl (NY)
LaHood
Lamborn
Latham
LaTourette
Lee
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (GA)
Lewis (KY)
Linder
LoBiondo
Lucas
Lungren, Daniel E.
Mack
Manzullo
Marchant
Marshall
Matheson
McCarthy (CA)
McCaul (TX)
McCotter
McCrery
McHenry
McHugh
McKeon
McMorris Rodgers
McNulty
Mica
Michaud
Miller (FL)
Miller (MI)
Miller, Gary
Moran (KS)
Murphy, Tim
Musgrave
Myrick
Neugebauer
Nunes
Paul
Pearce
Pence
Peterson (PA)
Petri
Pickering
Pitts
Platts
Poe
Porter
Price (GA)
Pryce (OH)
Putnam
Radanovich
Ramstad
Regula
Rehberg
Reichert
Renzi
Reynolds
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rogers (MI)
Rohrabacher
Ros-Lehtinen
Roskam
Royce
Ryan (WI)
Sali
Saxton
Schmidt
Sensenbrenner
Sessions
Shadegg
Shays
Shimkus
Shuster
Simpson
Smith (NE)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Souder
Stearns
Sullivan
Tancredo
Taylor
Terry
Thornberry
Tiahrt
Tiberi
Turner
Upton
Walberg
Walden (OR)
Walsh (NY)
Wamp
Waters
Watson
Weldon (FL)
Weller
Westmoreland
Whitfield
Wicker
Wilson (NM)
Wilson (SC)
Wolf
Woolsey
Young (AK)
Young (FL)


—- ANSWERED “PRESENT”    1 —

Stark


—- NOT VOTING    3 —

Davis, Jo Ann Kanjorski Watt

The bill passed with exactly the 218 votes required.  One Democrat voted “Present”. Eight Democrats voted No because they oppose further funding of this war:
Dennis Kucinich, John Lewis, Mike McNulty, Mike Michaud,  Maxine Waters, Barbara Lee, Diane Watson, and Lynn Woolsey.

March on the Pentagon Photos

Digital Grace has stunning photos of last week’s March on the Pentagon in Washington, D.C.

War and Taxes

I have about had it!

The Bush Criminal Mob is asking Congress for $123 billion more dollars to fund their total demolition of Iraq and their future crime sprees in such places as Iran and perhaps, Syria.

 

Despite the notable and courageous actions of such Congress Reps as Barbara Lee (D-Ca), Lynn Woolsey (D-Ca), Maxine Waters (D-Ca), Dennis Kucinich (D-Oh) and John Lewis (D-Ga ), it looks like the supplemental bill is going to sail through Congress with the backing of the Dem leadership who blocked the adding of any amendments reining in Bloody George to the supplemental funding.

The ungodly evil rhetoric of ?supporting the troops? to defend their support of this new pile of blood money is immoral and insupportable?especially considering the fact that our VA hospitals are falling apart and returning Vets are committing suicide because they can?t get the help they need to throw some water on the fire of their PTSD. And we know that Congress, better than anybody, knows who really gets these billions of dollars, because some of that money trickles down into many of their own pockets: the War Machine.

Besides the stranglehold that the War Machine has on our government and our lives, the weasly Dem leadership is using the flesh of our flesh as political pawns in their high-stakes game of presidential politics. The Dems are frightened by the fact that if they bravely bring our troops out of the mess that they are mired in, thereby ?losing? the war in Iraq, that the Dems will lose the presidency in 2008.

There is so many things wrong with that stinkin? thinkin.? First of all, there is not one hair breadth of difference between a Republican and someone who votes, talks, and acts like a Republican. Secondly, our troops should be treated like they are human beings, with tender loving care knowing that each and every one of them is precious to somebody. They should not be used as cold political calculations.

The last two reasons are obvious and I know that they Dem leadership is as aware of these reasons as I am: the occupation of Iraq was lost as soon as the first tank rolled over the border and the first smart bomb was dropped on innocent people in Baghdad. It was fated to be a monumental failure because its foundation was feebly pasted together on lies, deception and greed and citizens of a country have more at stake to overcome occupiers and in the whole history of this planet an occupation has never been successful and always profoundly weakens the imperial occupiers.

If the Dems would step out and lead out of their humanity and not with their greed for money/power like the Bush Mob, then there would be a landslide in 2008 and we Americans could revel in authentic and reasonable leaders, not mourn another administration of craven cowards.

This supplemental funding bill will pass, and I believe that giving George Bush a blank check for more killing is reprehensible and I refuse to support these crimes against humanity with my own funds.

I urge every American with a heart, compassion, and a sense for justice and a return to moral based leadership to join me in withholding our money from this murderous and callous government.

Give your money to peace or justice groups instead. Give your money to homeless shelters; grass-roots Katrina recovery efforts; create a ?Peace Scholarship? at your local college to reward a young person who doesn?t want to join the military to pay for college; give to Veteran?s groups who are advocating for better care for our veterans or a group like IVAW which is a group of returning vets who are actively trying to stop the war; give to War Resisters to support legal aid for our active duty soldiers who refuse to go to war; give to Camp Casey; give to your local peace group.

I am sure there are thousands of places to put our money besides the pockets of the Military Industrial Complex. So many people and groups have been damaged because of our war economy. A lot of good could be done with our tax dollars instead of funding continued killing.

Our elected officials have failed us miserably. We elected them to oppose George and his war, not support him. We are not being represented properly and I, for one, refuse to be taxed by them.

Think about it. Reflect.

Google: ?War Tax Resistance? for tons of good information.

Cindy Sheehan is the mother of Spc. Casey Sheehan who was killed in Bush?s war of terror on 04/04/04.
She is the co-founder and president of Gold Star Families for Peace and The Camp Casey Peace Institute.

Rocky hits the New York Times – will be on call-in show today

There is lots of news nationally about Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson’s outspoken stance on the U.S. Administraton and the Iraq War.  One Utah has  post on Rocky and Bill O’Reilly.

I received word this morning that  Rocky Anderson will appear on KCPW‘s Midday Metro show today, Friday, March 23, at 10am MST.  He will be taking your calls at:   801- 359-5279.

Rocky will also be the guest of a nationally syndicated NPR program on Monday.  Anderson will be the featured guest of “On Point,” which airs at 11 am exclusively on KCPW.

 Anderson will tape the program from the KCPW studios on Monday morning, March 26th.

Rocky will likely be addressing impeachment on both shows.

Here is a piece that appeared on Common Dreams yesterday. 

Published on Thursday, March 22, 2007 by the New York Times
by Kirk Johnson
 

SALT LAKE CITY — Rocky Anderson may not be the most liberal mayor in America. But here in the most conservative state, he might as well be.


Mayor Rocky Anderson has become a national anti-Bush spokesman. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Just being himself is enough to galvanize, divide or enrage people who have followed his career as Salt Lake City’s mayor, and who are now watching him become, in the twilight of his final term, a national spokesman for the excoriation and impeachment of President Bush.

[“President Bush is a war criminal,” Mr. Anderson, a Democrat, said at a rally here on Monday marking the fourth anniversary of the war in Iraq. “Let impeachment be the first step toward national reconciliation — and toward penance for the outrages committed in our nation’s name.”]

Mr. Anderson, a 55-year-old lapsed Mormon and former civil litigator with a rich baritone and a mane of patrician-silver hair, is no stranger to strong talk and political stances that leave his audiences breathless with exasperation, admiration or sometimes a mixture of both.

He has presented his densely footnoted constitutional argument against Mr. Bush’s presidency in speeches from the Washington Legislature to peace rallies in Washington, D.C., making him a favorite punching bag of conservative talk show hosts and bloggers well beyond his home state. [He went on Bill O’Reilly’s show on Fox News on Tuesday, for example, and Mr. O’Reilly promptly called him “a kook.”]

Mr. Anderson cheerfully conceded in an interview in his office that he had no hope whatsoever of a statewide political future in Utah because people outside Salt Lake City — who are far more likely to be conservative, Republican and members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — are likely to hate him. But in what has been a trademark of his seven years in office, he can seem equally disdainful of those who disdain him.

“There’s a real resistance to change and an almost pathological devotion to leaders simply because they’re leaders,” he said, in describing fellow Utahans who do not share his views and who in large numbers support the president (and gave him 72 percent of their vote in 2004). “There’s a dangerous culture of obedience throughout much of this country that’s worse in Utah than anywhere.”

Critics and supporters alike agree that Mr. Anderson — whose given name is Ross but who is known by almost everyone here as Rocky, with no last name necessary — is genuinely passionate and devoted to the causes he has brought to the mayor’s office, including global warming, genocide in Darfur, gay and lesbian rights and the war in Iraq.

But those efforts, many people say, have sometimes made him seem like more of a mayor to the world than a fix-the-potholes, sweep-the-sidewalks business-booster for this city of 180,000 people.

And in pursuing those political interests with the same confrontational style that he has brought to the fight for impeachment in recent months, Mr. Anderson has left burned bridges behind him the way other people leave fingerprints.

“What he’s doing lets people know that free speech is alive and well in Salt Lake City,” said K. Eric Jergensen, a member of the City Council, which, like the mayor’s office, is formally nonpartisan, though Mr. Jergensen described himself as a Republican.

“But it seems we’ve lost our ability to sit down amicably and discuss things,” Mr. Jergensen added. “When we step to the rhetorical sidelines and all we do is spit venom and fire, it isn’t effective.”

Mr. Anderson, who described himself as an exacting boss — others say workaholic micromanager — has gone through City Hall employees with blazing regularity, including at least five chiefs of staff.

In 2001, he alienated the Republican-controlled Legislature by joining with environmentalists and mass-transit advocates in a lawsuit to block a major north-south highway project that Mr. Anderson said would harm air quality and wetlands near the Great Salt Lake.

He rarely went to the Capitol after that to lobby on the city’s behalf, City Council members and former staff members said, because everybody knew it would be counterproductive.

Even some fellow Democrats say the city probably suffered from the anti-Rocky backlash.

“He is one of those politicians who people love to hate, and sometimes he gave the Legislature a great excuse not to do their jobs where Salt Lake City was concerned,” said Nancy Saxton, a Democrat and City Council member who is running for mayor in the November election.

Mr. Anderson announced last July that he would not seek a third term, saying he wanted to devote the rest of his life to grass-roots organizing involving human rights and global warming. He said in the interview that he had not made specific plans.

One of the mayor’s former chiefs of staff, Deeda Seed, who was fired in 2005, described her former boss this way: “I used to be good friends with him. He’s incredibly intelligent. He is delightful to talk to. He can be a really, really good friend. He could just benefit from a little therapy.”

(Ms. Seed said Mr. Anderson fired her after they disagreed on policy issues, including how to handle the news media. He said she was “almost a complete disaster as an employee and I had no choice but to fire her.”)

Supporters say Mr. Anderson has made Utah more interesting, at the very least, by highlighting the political diversity that exists at the state’s heart, in the state’s capital and largest city. He first won office in 1999, and re-election in 2003, essentially by winning the votes of non-Mormons, who constitute about 55 percent of the city’s population. (Statewide, Mormons constitute about two-thirds of the population.) In his last election, he got 54 percent of the vote, even though about 80 percent of Mormons voted against him, he said.

Those election patterns — non-Mormons mostly for Mr. Anderson, Mormons mostly against — set the rhythm for a mayoral administration that many people say has isolated Salt Lake City even more by emphasizing that the city’s political and cultural distinctiveness is also about religion and that being non-Mormon is synonymous with being liberal and urban and different.

“It’s embarrassing for the rest of us; Mayor Anderson is so over the top, nobody wants to be associated with him,” said Matthew R. Godfrey, mayor of the nearby city of Ogden. Mr. Godfrey said Mr. Anderson had not worked well with other mayors across the state and that he was out of step with fellow Utahans.

Mr. Anderson, who has been married and divorced twice, with a son now in college, said he believed that divisiveness could be a virtue. For too long, he said, Democrats have run toward the center, away from confrontation. And in a conservative place like Utah, he said, he just has to push harder.

“If you take a principled point of view and people fall down on one side or the other, you can either be characterized as being principled or being tough,” he said. “Or you can be dismissed as being divisive, and I think if that’s the definition of divisive, we need more people in politics who are divisive.”

Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

Memorial Candlelight Walk and Vigil Photos

About 100 people participated in the Memorial Candlelight Walk and Vigil yetserday. Most folks we had never seen before. One man said he had seen the announcement at 6:00pm on TV, dropped everything he was doing and drove all the way uptown from Kearns. He said he was tired of sitting around watching and decided it was time to do something. There were dozens more stories like this as we launched luminaries representing the deaths resulting from war in the creek.

Tons of media showed up – I haven’t seen anything in the news today (yet) about our event.

Nonetheless, it was beautiful and inspiring.

Here are some photos. The rest can be viewed at Stop the War


March 19 Iraq War Protest Events, Salt Lake City

Turn out was low yesterday, nonetheless, hundreds of protesters participated in yesterday’s anti-war events in Salt Lake City. The afternoon rally drew about 500. The evening Memorial Candlelight Walk and Vigil drew about 100.
Here are links to news and blog items about the events:

Local News
One Utah – Rocky Rocked’em Again
Stop the War Events organized by People for Peace and Justice of Utah
Salt Lake Tribune – Salt Lake City protesters decry Bush’s Iraq war
Salt Lake Tribune – Utahns protest Iraq war on anniversary
Deseret News – Soldier tells tales of horror as hundreds in Salt Lake City demonstrate
Fox 13 – Low Turnout At Anti-War Rally
KSL 5 – Poll: Residents Split Over Appropriateness of Rocky’s Anti-War Speeches
KSL 5 – Anti-War Rally and Vigil Mark 4th Anniversary of Iraq War
ABC 4 – Mayor Rocky Anderson leads anti-war rally and march
KUTV 2 – Protesters Turn Out In Salt Lake City

Mentions in National News
Kentucky.com – Rallies mark 4th anniversary of Iraq war
Pierceland Herald – Iraq war protests continue nationwide
Press TV – Anti-war protests continue across U.S.